Passion Passport

Around the World in London: A Neighborhood Guide

London is one of the most diverse cities in the world. But sticking to the city’s major tourist hotspots can mean missing out on some of the city’s best cuisine, local markets, and nightlife. Neighborhood-hopping is a great way to experience London’s multiculturalism. While some areas like Chinatown are obvious and easy to access, others require traveling further afield. These areas are often less touristy and offer more authentic representations of London life. Use this globally inspired neighborhood guide to travel the world within London.
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A Travel Guide to Northumberland, England

Northumberland is England’s northernmost and least populated county. There are only 64 people per square kilometre here, compared to some areas of London that have 16,000. Northumberland boasts beautiful scenery, historic towns, nature walks, sandy beaches, and more castles than any other English county. Though England’s North East does not attract quite as much international travel, Northumberland’s fascinating history and sweeping landscapes are worth a trip up north. Here is a highlights-reel guide to any good visit to Northumberland:

Around the World in London: A Neighborhood Guide

London is one of the most diverse cities in the world. But sticking to the city’s major tourist hotspots can mean missing out on some of the city’s best cuisine, local markets, and nightlife. Neighborhood-hopping is a great way to experience London’s multiculturalism. While some areas like Chinatown are obvious and easy to access, others require traveling further afield. These areas are often less touristy and offer more authentic representations of London life. Use this globally inspired neighborhood guide to travel the world within London.

Homesickness during Covid-19 Feels Different

I moved to London in September 2019. The first six months were ordinary; the next six were anything but. When the UK’s lockdown measures took effect in March, I realized that staying in London meant I would not see my family in Canada for some time. During the Covid-19 pandemic, the uncertainty surrounding travel makes homesickness worse. Whether an ocean away, or just across state lines, home feels further away than ever.

Eight Books to Get you Excited for your Next Travel Adventure – FlashpackerConnect Adventure Travel

Eight Books to Get you Excited for your Next Travel Adventure Missing travel? You are not alone. In the age of social distancing, travel is out of the question for the immediate future. Cancelling a trip can be devastating, but more time at home means more time to make post-quarantine plans. If we can’t travel the world ourselves, reading about dreamy destinations and heart-pounding adventure might be the next best thing.

Studying Abroad During the COVID-19 Lockdown

When I left Canada to pursue a master’s degree in England, I expected my life to change. But I never expected this. As I write this, I am living in London, UK during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. My International Journalism program at City, University of London has moved entirely online; our university campus is closed. Students are leaving my residence in droves, moving back to their home countries for the foreseeable future.

How to Make the Most of an Internship Abroad

While most internships come with defined start and end dates, temporary positions in one’s home country sometimes turn into full-time employment. Working abroad on a visa, however, means the start and end dates are much less flexible. Throughout my internship in the United States, I knew that no matter how much I loved my job, I would have to return to Canada when my visa expired. Here’s how I made the most of my final days in the U.S.A.: I enjoyed my internship in the United States immensely—

10 Things I Wish I Knew Before My U.S. Internship

I have officially completed my internship in Charleston, South Carolina; my first-ever work abroad experience. While I am pleased I took a leap and found a job outside my home country, I certainly made plenty of mistakes and faced numerous surprises while obtaining my visa and moving down South. As they say, hindsight is 20/20. With that in mind, here are a few facts I wish I knew (or, at the very least, wish I had thought about more carefully), before I accepted my U.S. internship: 1. Find th

An Outsider's Perspective on U.S. Politics

When I decided to move to the U.S. for a few months, I got a few quizzical looks and raised eyebrows from fellow Canadians. With the current political climate in the U.S.—from the detentions at the border, to the battles over abortion and women’s rights to their own bodies, to the deeply flawed man and his tweets at the helm of it all—it seemed to be a strange time to enter the States. While there are lots of small differences I’ve noticed while living in the South, I don’t often feel like I’m

The Reality of Nine-to-Fiving Abroad

It’s important to remember that working abroad is just that—work. As I take stock of the almost two months I’ve lived in South Carolina, what stands out the most is not meeting new people or exploring the city—it’s how much time I’ve spent in my new office. Beginning any new job is stressful: Every workplace is a unique environment with its own quirks, and learning the ropes is always draining. Despite how excited I was to begin my internship, and how great the experience has turned out to be a

Preparing to Work Abroad in America? Pack Your Patience

Some adventures are best left unplanned: spontaneous, flexible and ready to begin at a moments’ notice. Working abroad in the United States is not one of those adventures. After months of planning, re-arranging and refreshing email chains, my internship in the US will start on January 14th, which is two weeks later than I intended. The various stages of obtaining a U.S. work visa are full of uncertainty—more than anything, it’s been an exercise in patience. Unlike other work visas for placemen

The “Right” Job: How to Trust your Gut and Escape the Ordinary

I heard a lot of jokes about “post-grad problems” before I finished my degree. I understood the age-old struggle of needing real world job experience before finding a job in one's field, which begs the question: How, pray tell, is one supposed to actually gain this experience? As I neared graduation this past spring, I braced myself for the hardship of finding meaningful work connected to my degree in English and journalism. After all, it’s not exactly the most clear-cut degree to transfer into
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